18 Dec 2017

Perth Police HQ - by Ninian Reid via Flickr
This article was originally published on this website

Former police negotiator opens up on helping suicidal and neutralising threats from gunmen

Cathy MacDonald knows it’s good to talk. She has guided suicidal people down from bridges, dealt with pirates of the high seas and negotiated the surrender of gunmen locked in ­buildings. Cathy, 50, from Perth, joined the police as a cadet in 1983, becoming a constable two years later. Her communication skills were spotted early in her career, and she deployed them effectively as a bobby on the beat. In 2004, she decided to use her skillset for specialist tasks and trained as a hostage and crisis negotiator. Serving with Tayside Police and then Police Scotland, she loved every minute of the job with its challenges and ever-changing scenarios.

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/lifestyle/health-fitness/i-still-want-help-people-11711694

Police Scotland to cough up £3m for cops’ overtime

Police Scotland face a multi-million payout to officers after a crucial legal battle about overtime. Thousands of serving and retired officers are due money following the successful test case brought by the Scottish Police Federation at the Court of Session in Edinburgh. Lady Wise ruled that officers are legally entitled to an extra shift payment for every 24 hours they work away from home.

Frontline staff who were sent away on duties can now make claims going back to June 2012. Officers will be able to claim up to £250 per shift, depending on their rank and length of service.

http://www.dailyrecord.co.uk/news/scottish-news/police-scotland-cough-up-3m-11709715

Dani Garavelli: Police Scotland firearms policy lacks scrutiny

Police Scotland should have exposed its latest strategy to far greater public scrutiny given its controversial history, writes Dani Garavelli. On the face of it, the proposal by Police Scotland to allow armed officers to attend non-violent incidents if they are closer to the scene than their unarmed counterparts makes logistical sense. With the number of front-line officers falling, it seems wasteful to have some of the most highly-trained sitting idle when they could be mucking in, attending road accidents and improving response times.

https://www.scotsman.com/news/opinion/dani-garavelli-police-scotland-firearms-policy-lacks-scrutiny-1-4641130

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