Official Statistics: Justice Data Lab statistics: July 2018

Ministry of Justice - by Jim Larrison via Flickr

The report is released by the Ministry of Justice and produced in accordance with arrangements approved by the UK Statistics Authority.

For further information about the Justice Data Lab, please refer to the guidance.

Key findings this quarter

Three requests are being published this quarter: The Amber Foundation Programme, Forward Trust’s Alcohol Dependence Treatment Programme and KeepOut’s rehabilitation programme. Also published are experimental statistics that look at employment and benefit outcomes for a test case, the Prisoners’ Education Trust.

The Amber Foundation

The Amber Foundation aims to provide a safe and nurturing environment for young homeless people with complex needs at three community based residential centres located in Devon, Wiltshire and Surrey as well as providing 24-hour support across the UK.

The overall results show that those who received the intervention had a lower rate of reoffending than those who did not. More people would need to be available for analysis in order to determine the direction of the difference in the frequency of proven reoffences during the one year after release.

Forward Trust’s Alcohol Dependence Treatment Programme

Forward Trust’s Alcohol Dependence Treatment Programme is an intensive six-week, twelve-step programme, which aims to reduce reoffending and improve outcomes for participants.

The overall results show that more people would need to be available for analysis in order to determine the way in which the programme affects a person’s reoffending behaviour, but this should not be taken to mean that the programme fails to affect it.

KeepOut

KeepOut is a crime diversion scheme which works with offenders in custody. Offenders are trained to run intervention programmes with young people who are already involved in criminal activity or are at risk of becoming so. The aims are both to prevent the young people from committing crimes, and to rehabilitate offenders in custody, with the Data Lab analysis relating to the impact on offenders in custody only.

The overall results show that more people would need to be available for analysis in order to determine the direction of the difference in the number of people who commit a proven reoffence during one year after release, but this should not be taken to mean that the programme fails to affect it.

Experimental statistics: Employment and benefits outcomes test case

New measures that investigates employment and benefit outcomes have been explored for the first time in the JDL, using information from DWP and HMRC as well as data from the Prisoners’ Education Trust (PET) charity, which provides grants for distance learning and creative projects for prisoners.

Key results from this report indicate that those who participated in the programme were more likely to be employed than those who did not participate and spent more time in employment overall in the one-year period following release from prison. They also spent less time receiving out-of-work benefits.

Feedback on these experimental statistics

This report is the first test case exploring employment and benefit outcomes of offenders who have participated in an intervention programme. We are seeking feedback, which will be used to shape our ongoing work in this area.

Justice Data Lab service: available reoffending data

The Justice Data Lab team have brought in reoffending data for the first quarter of 2016 into the service. It is now possible for an organisation to submit information on the individuals it was working with up to the end of March 2016, in addition to during the years 2002 to 2015.

The bulletin is produced and handled by the Ministry’s analytical professionals and production staff. Pre-release access of up to 24 hours is granted to the following persons: Ministry of Justice Secretary of State, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State – Minister for Prisons and Probation, Parliamentary Under-Secretary of State – Minister for Offender Health and female offenders, Permanent Secretary, Director General of Offender Reform and Commissioning Group, Director of Communication and Information, Director of Analytical Services, Head and Deputy Head of News, Chief Press Officer, 15 Policy and Analytical Advisers for reducing reoffending and rehabilitation policy, special advisors, 5 press officers, and 9 private secretaries.

 

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