23rd November 2018

Perth Police HQ - by Ninian Reid via Flickr

23rd November 2018

Controversial technology which allows police officers to override passwords to quickly harvest data from mobile phones should not be introduced until its legality is resolved, according to a committee of MSPs. Police Scotland had planned to begin a national rollout of the “cyber kiosks” next month despite privacy concerns. Writing to justice secretary Humza Yousaf and Chief Constable Iain Livingstone on behalf of Holyrood’s justice sub-committee on policing, John Finnie MSP said the introduction of the technology should be postponed.

https://www.scotsman.com/news/politics/police-told-to-pause-mobile-device-rollout-over-privacy-fears-1-4833920

Scotland’s national police force finds its feet

In 2013 the residents of sleepy Highland villages noticed something odd. Armed police had started popping up on their streets. Cops with guns were spotted at a bakery in Brora, a fishing village, sparking alarm. Others queuing in a supermarket caused a stir down the road in Inverness. Police vans clad in anti-riot gear cruised through remote moorlands. That year, Scotland’s eight regional police forces became a single national squad. Merging was intended to save money by ending the duplication of hr departments, call centres and so on. It was also meant to improve policing. National units would investigate rare crimes like murder, leaving local bobbies to get on with bread-and-butter stuff.

https://www.economist.com/britain/2018/11/24/scotlands-national-police-force-finds-its-feet

Police are hunting a woman after a health worker was stabbed in a hospital car park. Emergency services rushed to Ailsa Hospital in North Ayrshire at around 10am on Thursday after a 42-year-old community support worker was attacked outside the hospital’s addiction services unit.

https://www.heraldscotland.com/news/17242035.police-hunt-woman-after-worker-stabbed-in-ailsa-hospital-car-park/

 

Police investigation into Lockerbie bombing prosecution finds no evidence of police criminality

A police inquiry into the handling of the investigation and prosecution of the Lockerbie bomber has found no evidence of criminality, The Times reports. Nine allegations were examined by detectives over the course of four years in an investigation called Operation Sandwood. The claims by the Justice for Megrahi campaign group, made against the police, Crown Office and forensic officials, included perjury and perverting the course of justice.

https://www.scottishlegal.com/article/police-investigation-into-lockerbie-bombing-prosecution-finds-no-evidence-of-police-criminality

 

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